Why you should learn to code

A programmable sytem on a chip (PSOC). A great intro to hardware + software.

In the Middle and Dark Ages only the elite and educated knew how to read and write. Fast forward a few hundred years later almost everyone can read and write.

In today’s ever increasing Digital World coding is becoming how we read and write. It’s becoming central to how we share ideas and create. Unfortunately only a few us us can code. Those of us who can code we’re NOT special, we’re not all super smart — we’re just ahead of the curve.

Eventually someone who can’t code will be “illiterate” just as someone who can’t read, write or do simple mathematics today maybe viewed as illiterate. Not everyone who can read/write/count is like Shakespeare or Einstein and not everyone who can code will be expected to be the next Steve Jobs or Bill Gates. But it’s still an important skill and humanity is heading towards that digital age.

Coding is not incredibly difficult. Anyone can learn to code.

Jump the curve and pick up coding as a basic skill in addition to your true passion whatever it is. There are very many free resources available online that can teach one how to code including books at any local library.

Some resources:
https://www.coursera.org/learn/python
https://www.codecademy.com/
http://it-ebooks.info/
http://guides.codepath.com/android (android development)

A programmable sytem on a chip (PSOC). A great intro to hardware + software.

A programmable sytem on a chip (PSOC). A great intro to hardware + software.

The picture above is of a Programmable System On a Chip (Psoc).  It’s a great introduction to hardware + software. It allows one to write software with a clear focus and emphasis on hardware.

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